ITIL® Service Capability Planning, Protection and Optimisation

Enhance productivity with better planning, protection and optimising processes

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course is designed to help the delegates in getting awareness of concepts and terminologies used to create an effective IT infrastructure within the organisation. Planning, Protection and optimisation is one of the qualifications in Service Capability stream. It contributes four credits in gaining ITIL® Expert Certification.

  • Enhance PPO process within the organisation

  • We offer the best price in the industry

  • Our help and support team is always available to support the queries of delegates

  • Many leading brands trust us

  • Get familiar with various tools and techniques used in PPO

WHAT'S INCLUDED ?

Find out what's included in the training programme.

Includes

Exam(s) included

Exams are provided, as part of the course. Obtaining certification is dependant on passing these exams

Includes

Certificate

Delegates will get certification of completion at the end of the course.

Includes

Tutor Support

A dedicated tutor will be at your disposal throughout the training to guide you through any issues.

Includes

Key Learning Points

Clear and concise objectives to guide delegates through the course.

PREREQUISITES

The professionals who want to attend this course must hold ITIL® Foundation Certificate.

TARGET AUDIENCE

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course best for the following professionals:

  • Capacity Managers
  • IT Professionals
  • Disaster Recovery Managers
  • Availability Managers
  • IT Service Continuity Managers
  • IT Security and Risk Managers

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?

  • Learn about the various methods and procedures used in Planning, Protection and Optimisation
  • Identify and manage risks that may occur in PPO
  • Determine various key activities, processes, roles and responsibilities involved in PPO
  • Determine the considerations for Continual Service Improvement for enhanced productivity
  • Evaluate Planning, Protection and Optimisation processes by using key metrics
  • Recognise the details that comprise every process of PPO

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW

MSP Training introduces ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course that put the focus of delegates on operational-level processes activities. The delegates will be taught to execute these processes practically and more effectively. Our courses are designed and delivered by certified and experienced professionals.

Exam

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course will have the following exam pattern:

  • 8 multiple choice questions (MCQ’s)
  • 70 percent marks to pass the exam
  • Exam duration- 90 minutes

 

*After completing 4 days of classroom training and successfully passing your Foundation Exam, the fifth day of this course is a flexible exam preparation day to complete at your convenience in order to prepare you to take and pass your Practitioner exam online.

We provide comprehensive support during the exam process to make the experience as simple as possible. This exam can be taken at a suitable time, subject to availability; online, anywhere.

Benefits of online exams include:

  • Proven higher pass rates
  • Quicker Results
  • Save Travel Costs
  • Flexibility
  • Convenient
  • Take your exam at your home, office, or work when you are ready 

PROGRAM CONTENT

Introduction: PPO

  • Define Planning, Protection and Optimisation phase
  • Scope and Objectives
  • Lifecycle within Planning, Protection and Optimisation context
  • Value of Service Design
  • Requirements for the services
  • Business Requirements and Drivers
  • Business value of Service Design
  • Comprehensive and Integrated Service Design
  • Strategy and Policy of Service Design
  • Optimise the performance for Service Design
  • Purpose and Objective of Design Coordination Processes
  • Scope of Design Coordination Process
  • Business Value of the Design Coordination Process

Introduction: Demand Management

  • Introduction to Demand Management
  • Scope and Objective
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Inputs, Outputs and Triggers
  • Interfaces of the process
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges in the process
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Capacity Management

  • Introduction to Capacity Management
  • Scope
  • Purpose and Objectives
  • Business Value
  • Key concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and Techniques
  • Input, output and triggers
  • Process interfaces with Capacity Management
  • Information Management in Capacity Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Availability Management

  • Define Availability Management
  • Scope and objective
  • Business Value
  • Basic Concepts and Terminologies
  • Vital Business Functions
  • Methods and Techniques
  • Input, Output and triggers
  • Process Interfaces
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: IT Service Continuity Management

  • Define IT Service Continuity Management
  • Scope of IT Service Continuity Management
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and techniques
  • Interfaces of process
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Information Security Management

  • Introduction to Information Security Management
  • Purpose and scope
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and techniques
  • Input, output and triggers
  • Process interfaces
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities                                                                                                    

Introduction: Technology and Implementation consideration

  • Define Technology and Implementation Considerations
  • Practices for implementing organisational services
  • Basic Service Design Technology
  • Architecture of Technology and Management
  • Tools and technology to support Service Design
  • Plan and implement service management tools
  • CSFs, Risks and Challenges

DATES, PRICES AND EVENTS

Course Name Dates Duration Price
ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimisation 21/12/2020 Wolverhampton
5 days
£4944

ABOUT Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton is a metropolitan borough and second largest part of the West Midlands with a population of around 249,470 according to 2011 census. The city was founded in 985, and the name of the city is derived from Wulfrun in the Anglo-Saxon period. Earlier, the city was developed as a market town particularly in the woollen trade. During the industrial era, it became a principal centre for steel production, cars and motorcycles manufacturing and coal mining. The city’s economy is based on the service sector as well as the engineering industry.

History

In 910, the city served as a battle site between the unified West Saxons and Mercian Angles against the raiding Danes. Initially, the city grew as a market town in 1179, but at that time the city did not own a royal charter for conducting a market and the matter brought to the attention of King John in 1204. The charter was eventually granted for holding a weekly market on a Wednesday by Henry III in 1258. The city was considered as one of the staple towns of the woollen trade in 14th and 15th century. The Wolverhampton Grammar School was founded in 1512 and known as one of the oldest active schools in the United Kingdom.

A large number of metal industries started their operations in the city from the 16th century onwards, including the iron and brass working and lock and key making. The city was affected by two great fires in 1590, and 1696 resulted in the destruction of 60 homes and left nearly 700 people homeless. The first fire engine was purchased at the beginning of 18th century after the second fire. The presence of extensive coal and iron deposits in the area contributed towards the wealth of the city in the Victorian era and huge amount of industries established in the city.

In 1837, the railways arrived the city and the first station was situated at Wednesfield Heath, also designated as a First Class station. The station was destroyed in 1965 and replaced by the centrally located station on Stour valley line. Wolverhampton railway works were settled in the city in 1849 and became Great Western Railway’s northern division workshop in 1854. During the Great Famine period of disease and mass starvation, a large number of immigrants from Wales and Ireland moved to the city in the 19th century. The city was represented politically by the longest serving MP in parliamentary history, Charles Pelham Villiers.

The city saw a large expansion in bicycle industry from 1868 to 1975 with the establishment of more than 200 bicycle manufacturing companies included Marston, Star and Viking. The large volume of bicycles manufacturers left the city between 1960 and 1970. The public housing development project started in the city after the end of the Great War provided 550 new council houses by 1923. The first large-scale housing development took place in the northeast part of the city, Low Hill estate had more than 2000 new council houses and became one of the largest housing estates in the United Kingdom at that time. Huge Asian immigrants were settled in the city during the period (1940-1960), and Sikh community from the Indian state of Punjab contribute approximately 9.1% of the city’s population.

Economy

The economy of the city was initially based on automobiles, manufacturing and engineering industries. These traditional industries have closed over the years. Presently, the city is largely based on the service industry including the sectors of education, hotels, public administration and health, provide 74% employment to the workforce of the city. Another major employer of the city provided job to 12000 employees is Wolverhampton City Council. The city is home to Birmingham Midshires, University of Wolverhampton, Marston’s and Carillion.

Overview of ITIL® 2011 Edition

Information Techno...