ITIL® Service Capability Planning, Protection and Optimisation

Enhance productivity with better planning, protection and optimising processes

ABOUT THE PROGRAM

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course is designed to help the delegates in getting awareness of concepts and terminologies used to create an effective IT infrastructure within the organisation. Planning, Protection and optimisation is one of the qualifications in Service Capability stream. It contributes four credits in gaining ITIL® Expert Certification.

  • Enhance PPO process within the organisation

  • We offer the best price in the industry

  • Our help and support team is always available to support the queries of delegates

  • Many leading brands trust us

  • Get familiar with various tools and techniques used in PPO

WHAT'S INCLUDED ?

Find out what's included in the training programme.

Includes

Exam(s) included

Exams are provided, as part of the course. Obtaining certification is dependant on passing these exams

Includes

Certificate

Delegates will get certification of completion at the end of the course.

Includes

Tutor Support

A dedicated tutor will be at your disposal throughout the training to guide you through any issues.

Includes

Key Learning Points

Clear and concise objectives to guide delegates through the course.

PREREQUISITES

The professionals who want to attend this course must hold ITIL® Foundation Certificate.

TARGET AUDIENCE

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course best for the following professionals:

  • Capacity Managers
  • IT Professionals
  • Disaster Recovery Managers
  • Availability Managers
  • IT Service Continuity Managers
  • IT Security and Risk Managers

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?

  • Learn about the various methods and procedures used in Planning, Protection and Optimisation
  • Identify and manage risks that may occur in PPO
  • Determine various key activities, processes, roles and responsibilities involved in PPO
  • Determine the considerations for Continual Service Improvement for enhanced productivity
  • Evaluate Planning, Protection and Optimisation processes by using key metrics
  • Recognise the details that comprise every process of PPO

Enquire Program

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PROGRAM OVERVIEW

MSP Training introduces ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course that put the focus of delegates on operational-level processes activities. The delegates will be taught to execute these processes practically and more effectively. Our courses are designed and delivered by certified and experienced professionals.

Exam

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimization course will have the following exam pattern:

  • 8 multiple choice questions (MCQ’s)
  • 70 percent marks to pass the exam
  • Exam duration- 90 minutes

 

*After completing 4 days of classroom training and successfully passing your Foundation Exam, the fifth day of this course is a flexible exam preparation day to complete at your convenience in order to prepare you to take and pass your Practitioner exam online.

We provide comprehensive support during the exam process to make the experience as simple as possible. This exam can be taken at a suitable time, subject to availability; online, anywhere.

Benefits of online exams include:

  • Proven higher pass rates
  • Quicker Results
  • Save Travel Costs
  • Flexibility
  • Convenient
  • Take your exam at your home, office, or work when you are ready 

PROGRAM CONTENT

Introduction: PPO

  • Define Planning, Protection and Optimisation phase
  • Scope and Objectives
  • Lifecycle within Planning, Protection and Optimisation context
  • Value of Service Design
  • Requirements for the services
  • Business Requirements and Drivers
  • Business value of Service Design
  • Comprehensive and Integrated Service Design
  • Strategy and Policy of Service Design
  • Optimise the performance for Service Design
  • Purpose and Objective of Design Coordination Processes
  • Scope of Design Coordination Process
  • Business Value of the Design Coordination Process

Introduction: Demand Management

  • Introduction to Demand Management
  • Scope and Objective
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Inputs, Outputs and Triggers
  • Interfaces of the process
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges in the process
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Capacity Management

  • Introduction to Capacity Management
  • Scope
  • Purpose and Objectives
  • Business Value
  • Key concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and Techniques
  • Input, output and triggers
  • Process interfaces with Capacity Management
  • Information Management in Capacity Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Availability Management

  • Define Availability Management
  • Scope and objective
  • Business Value
  • Basic Concepts and Terminologies
  • Vital Business Functions
  • Methods and Techniques
  • Input, Output and triggers
  • Process Interfaces
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: IT Service Continuity Management

  • Define IT Service Continuity Management
  • Scope of IT Service Continuity Management
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and techniques
  • Interfaces of process
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities

Introduction: Information Security Management

  • Introduction to Information Security Management
  • Purpose and scope
  • Business Value
  • Basic concepts and terminologies
  • Methods and techniques
  • Input, output and triggers
  • Process interfaces
  • Information Management
  • CSFs and KPIs
  • Risks and Challenges
  • Roles and Responsibilities                                                                                                    

Introduction: Technology and Implementation consideration

  • Define Technology and Implementation Considerations
  • Practices for implementing organisational services
  • Basic Service Design Technology
  • Architecture of Technology and Management
  • Tools and technology to support Service Design
  • Plan and implement service management tools
  • CSFs, Risks and Challenges

ITIL® Service Capability - Planning, Protection and Optimisation Enquiry

 

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Reach us at 02036 039666 or info@msptraining.com for more information.

ABOUT Milton Keynes

Milton Keynes is a town in Buckinghamshire, South East England, that lies equidistant from London, Birmingham, Oxford, Cambridge and Leicester.  Although the town was found as recent as January 1967 to provide for the more residential area, archaeologists have traced its existence back to the Bronze Age. When the town of Milton Keynes came into existence in 1967 it took under its umbrella the existing towns of Bletchley, Wolverton and Stony Stratford. The town got its name from the  Middle Age village of Milton Keynes which was mentioned as Middeltone in the 11th Century.

The town has a population of 250,00 as of now which is almost 5 times than it was when it came into existence in 1967.The design of this town was created by known urban planners and architects including Lord Norman Foster, Sir Richard MacCormac, Ralph Erskine, Henning Larsen, Martin Richardson and John Winter. The design the created was of a modernist type and used the grid square system.

The town is home to various parkland and lakes which are now known to characterize Milton Keynes now. Though one may find very tall buildings in Milton Keynes today, this was not so until 2004. Earlier, as a rule, no building could be taller than a tree.Milton Keynes is a combination of both the ancient and modern attracts visitors and new residents alike.

Villages and Towns in Milton Keynes

  • Bletchley - first recorded as Blechelai in the 12th century was a major Victorian junction that was the main cause of its development during that period. The villages of Water Eaton and Fenny Stratford also became a part of Milton Keynes later on.
  • New Bradwell – It was built for the railway workers especially to the north of Bradwell, across the canal and the railway, to the east of Wolverton. The old Wolverton to Newport Pagnell Line has now been converted to a Redway, a favourite for cyclists and so named because of the red pathways.
  • Great Linford - mentioned as Linford in the in the Domesday Book as Linford, features a church dating to 1215 AD that is dedicated to Saint Andrew. What is now an arts museum used to be the outer buildings of the 17th-century manor house. The Linford Manor has also become a well-known studio for recording.

Existing Districts and Councils of Milton Keynes

  • Bletchley and Fenny Stratford:, Central Bletchley, Denbigh North, Water Eaton, Denbigh East, Brick fields Denbigh West Fenny Stratford, Granby, Mount Farm, Newton Leys, Fenny Lock
  • Bradwell: Bradwell village, Bradwell, Bradwell Common, Rooksley, Heelands
  • Bradwell Abbey: Rooksley, Kiln Farm, Two Mile Ash, Wymbush, Stacey Bushes
  • Broughton and Milton Keynes: Middleton (including Milton Keynes Village), Pineham, Atterbury, Brook Furlong, Broughton, Fox Milne, Oakgrove, Northfield
  • Campbell Park: Springfield, Fishermead, Newlands, Oldbrook, Woolstone, Winterhill, Willen and Willen Lake
  • Central Milton Keynes: Campbell Park and Central Milton Keynes
  • Great Linford: Blakelands, Conniburrow, Downs Barn, Giffard Park, Bolbeck Park, Great Linford, Pennyland, Downhead Park, Neath Hill, Willen Park, Tongwell
  • Kents Hill, Monkston and Brinklow: Kents Hill, Brinklow, Monkston, Kingston
  • New Bradwell
  • Loughton: Great Holm, Loughton Lodge,  Loughton, Knowlhill
  • Old Woughton: Woughton Park, Woughton on the Green, Passmore
  • Shenley Brook End: Furzton, Emerson Valley, Kingsmead, Snelshall, Shenley Brook End, Westcroft, Tattenhoe Park, Tattenhoe,
  • Shenley Church End: Grange Farm, Crownhill, Melbourne, Hazeley, Oxley Park, Oakhill, Woodhill, Shenley Church End
  • Simpson: West Ashland, Simpson, Ashland
  • Stantonbury: Blue Bridge, Bancroft/Bancroft Park, Linford Wood, Bradville, Stantonbury Field, Stantonbury, Oakridge Park
  • Stony Stratford: Galley Hill, Fullers Slade
  • Walton: Walton, Walton Hall, Caldecotte, Old Farm Park, Brown's Wood, Tilbrook, Tower Gate, Walnut Tree, Walton Park, Wavendon Gate.
  • West Bletchley: Denbigh Hall, Old Bletchley, Far Bletchley, West Bletchley
  • Wolverton and Greenleys: Wolverton, Old Wolverton, Greenleys, Hodge Lea, Stonebridge
  • Woughton: Netherfield, Beanhill, Peartree Bridge, Bleak Hall, Elfield Park, Coffee Hall, Eaglestone, Leadenhall, Redmoor, Tinkers Bridge.

Overview of ITIL® 2011 Edition

Information Techno...